My review of the ‘Make It Slow’ exhibition in Scarborough is published in Crafts Magazine Jan/Feb 2014

photo copyI was delighted to see my review of the ‘Make It Slow’ exhibition at Woodend Gallery, Scarborough has been published in the Jan/Feb 2014 edition of Crafts Magazine. It has been given a whole page. Crafts is one of my favourite magazines, and one I have read for several years.

The exhibition consisted of a beautifully intricate display of textiles by some of the UK’s top makers. Emphasis was on sustainability of materials and in applying the ‘Slow philosophy’ to craft.

An online copy of the review can be found on the Crafts website, here

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The Young Arnolfini Magazine, featuring my interview with Kate MccGwire

Over the summer when I was back from university, I rejoined the Young Arnolfini group in Bristol. This is a group for people aged 16 – 25 which organises art events, exhibitions and talks, as well as creating art and magazines to bridge the gap between young people and the Bristol art scene.

The latest magazine, with the theme of Perfectionism, has recently been printed. Look out for it in independent shops, student-friendly and art related places across Bristol.

Below are some images of the magazine’s pages, including my interview with international installation artist and sculptor Kate MccGwire.

 

‘Plaster reproduction in the context of 3D printing’

Published on the UCL Art Museum blog

DSC_0017-2-300x211Mona Hess, the project co-ordinator of the Petrie Museum’s 3D imaging project, curated a Pop-Up display this November on 3D printing and scanning at UCL Art Museum. 3D printing is a new and high profile phenomenon that started in 2007. The aim of the Petrie research has been to make use of the opportunities this technology creates in the museum space, such as engaging with a diverse and wide audience through the creation of 3D objects.

This Pop-Up workshop wove together film clips of low cost 3D scanning to demonstrate how different types of technology works, as well as addressing techniques first-hand with the use of a mini hand scanner.  Continue reading

The Press Photography of Red Vienna 1929 – 1938: An interview

Published on the UCL Art Museum BlogHelen Cobby interviews the researchers of the Red Vienna project, Eva Branscome and Catalina Mejia, before their Pop-Up Display and Lecture on 12th Nov.

Nazis handing out soup in front of Karl Marx Hof

Nazis handing out soup in front of Karl Marx Hof

This event is based round American press photographs depicting social housing estates during the turbulent inter-war years in Vienna. The photographs record three specific epochs within this time frame, from the building of the social houses to the take-over of Austria by the Nazis. The interview below includes Eva’s and Catalina’s thoughts about the development of their project, the active role of the photographs in the manipulation of historical events, as well as the importance of new photographic technologies emerging at the time and new relations between image and caption that this brings.

How would you summarise some of the fundamental debates posed by these press photographs? And what social constructions do you think the photographs specifically add to, or help create?

Eva: The first lot of photographs I have document the fantastic socialist housing projects that took place in Vienna at the end of the 1920s. The government realised it had a problem with overcrowding and people being homeless after the First World War. These housing projects addressed issues with families, and with children – such as not having a place to play, and being forced into crime. It was believed that by giving families decent homes, society could be changed and people could be made happier and more productive. These housing projects produced great excitement internationally by experimenting with Socialism through architecture and thinking about how it could change the world.  Continue reading