Articles for Craft Arts International magazine, 96

FullSizeRenderI have two articles published in Craft Arts International magazine, issue no. 96, June 2016.

My feature about sculptor Peter Randall-Page is included, with lots of wonderful images of his work. I visited Peter at his studio and interviewed him for this article, which looked at themes of nature and chance in his sculpture and drawings – and discussed his reflections and new directions in his art since he was made a Royal Academician in 2014.

 

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First two pages of the article on Peter Randall-Page

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Second two pages of my article about Randall-Page

My other article is a review of Richard Long’s solo exhibition at Arnolfini, Bristol, last year. I also interviewed Richard for this piece, and so it includes original ideas and quotations from the artist.

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My review of Richard Long’s solo exhibition at Arnolfini, Bristol

 

Josephine Pryde exhibition at the Arnolfini

Arnolfini gallery guideI am part of the Young Arnolfini, an arts collective for young people in Bristol that works closely with the Arnolfini gallery. In response to the current exhibition at this institution, I decided to write a ‘reading list’ to collect together the literature it made me think about or that could be set in dialogue with it. This turned into more of a reflection piece. The section on hands is published in the Arnolfini gallery guide, and I have turned the other two parts into audio guides in collaboration with the rest of the Young Arnolfini group.

 

Selected reading list for Josephine Pryde’s exhibition, ‘These are just things I say, they are not my opinions’

Photography and Technology

The Image Culture in which we live has been foreseen by many writers, including Guy Debord with his 1967 book, The Society of The Spectacle. Moholy Nagy also predicted the power of images over the whole of society in his essay and theory, The New Vision, 1989. He states, “The illiterate of the future will be the person ignorant of the use of the camera as well as the pen”.  Continue reading

The Young Arnolfini Magazine, featuring my interview with Kate MccGwire

Over the summer when I was back from university, I rejoined the Young Arnolfini group in Bristol. This is a group for people aged 16 – 25 which organises art events, exhibitions and talks, as well as creating art and magazines to bridge the gap between young people and the Bristol art scene.

The latest magazine, with the theme of Perfectionism, has recently been printed. Look out for it in independent shops, student-friendly and art related places across Bristol.

Below are some images of the magazine’s pages, including my interview with international installation artist and sculptor Kate MccGwire.

 

‘Curating Performance’ workshop at the Arnolfini

Published on the Arnolfini and Young Arnolfini blogs

Thursday 12th – Friday 13th September 2013

This two-day workshop on curating performance at the Arnolfini comprised of lectures and artists’ talks considering themes such as the relationship between social spaces, aesthetic experience and the audience, as well as similarities between curator and dramaturge. The opportunities and limitations associated with contextualising time-conscious work and live art were also considered. Additionally, notions of staging, movement, image and body were pertinent tropes throughout.

Jamie Eastman, the Arnolfini’s curator of performance, introduced the workshop and set the scene by asking the burning and complex question of what is a curator. He suggested a curator was a mediator of live moments, someone who is concerned with the production and presentation of narratives, and whose role links to theatre. Another memorable moment from the introduction was Eastman’s suggestion that the context for live performances is highly important as each event is made up of narratives told in social spaces.

Anja Dorn, a curator and guest professor for curatorial theory and dramaturgy at the University of Design Karlsruhe, began the first session with her workshop entitled ‘Curating the Audience’. She offered the notion that the increasing numbers of performance programmes were largely due to consumer culture and attempts to engage with, and even be dictated by, a wider consumer audience. Due to this, performance art takes place in what is called social spaces. (This breakdown of boundaries between art and the public dates back to the 1960s where de-bordering art was taken into new accessible places). From this observation, Dorn was keen for us to discuss how far these social spaces enable aesthetic experience and what implications this powerful consumer culture has for curatorial decisions.  Continue reading