Käthe Kollwitz exhibitions in Birmingham

Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945) was one of the leading artists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, notable for the emotional power of her drawing, printmaking and sculpture. Ikon gallery in Birmingham is currently holding a retrospective of the artist’s work, to which the Barber Institute has lent two prints. Camilla Smith, lecturer in the history of art at Birmingham University, and I have also curated a display at the Barber, which looks at Kollwitz in context with her contemporaries.

Have a look at my post, here, on Ikon’s blog for more information about Kollwitz and how these two Birmingham exhibitions link together.

 

 

Advertisements

Writing for ‘this is tomorrow’

Find my review of Andrea Luka Zimmerman’s exhibition at Spike Island, Bristol, on ‘this is tomorrow’:

http://thisistomorrow.info/articles/andrea-luka-zimmerman-common-ground

Title : Andrea Luka Zimmerman: Common Ground, installation view at Spike Island, 2017 Credit : Photos by Stuart Whipps, courtesy of Spike Island

Title : Andrea Luka Zimmerman: Common Ground, installation view at Spike Island, 2017           Credit : Photos by Stuart Whipps, courtesy of Spike Island

 

Reviewing Tate’s David Hockney exhibition for The British Art Journal

In the Spring 2017 issue of The British Art Journal you can find my review of Tate Britain’s David Hockney exhibition and accompanying catalogue. I attended the Tate’s Press View in order to write this review.

Hockney

 

 

Norman Ackroyd RA: The Invited Artist for the RWA’s Drawn exhibition

Norman Ackroyd has four atmospheric prints displayed in the Royal West of England Academy’s current exhibition, ‘Drawn’. Ackroyd is this year’s Invited Artist for this biennial open submission exhibition.

You can find my article about his work and contribution to the exhibition on the RWA’s blog, here.

Norman Ackroyd detail in the RWA's Drawn exhibition

Introducing the RWA exhibition, ‘Lines in a Landscape: Drawings from the Royal Collection’

Currently I’m assisting the marketing manager at the Royal West of England Academy (RWA) in Bristol with interpreting and promoting the gallery’s exhibitions. One of the highlights of this role is writing for the RWA blog. My first blog post is an introduction to the spring exhibition ‘Lines in a Landscape: Drawings from the Royal Collection’ with focus on the most featured artist, Claude Lorrain. Click here to be taken to this blog post on the RWA site.
Lines in a Landscape Banner 2017

Claude Gellée, called Le Lorrain (1604/5 – 82), ‘A landscape with a dance (The Marriage of Isaac and Rebecca?)’, c.1663, Pen and ink, grey and brown washes, white heightening, over black chalk, on paper washed buff (RCIN 913076), Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017.

Article in Art Space, local Leamington Spa magazine

For the summer 2016 issue of ‘Art Space’, a local magazine in Leamington Spa, I wrote a short history about the art gallery and museum and its collection of paintings. It covers key bequests, individual artworks (including the oldest painting in the collection), collecting strategies, and current exhibitions.

Art Space 1Art space 2

 

 

 

Articles for Craft Arts International magazine, 96

FullSizeRenderI have two articles published in Craft Arts International magazine, issue no. 96, June 2016.

My feature about sculptor Peter Randall-Page is included, with lots of wonderful images of his work. I visited Peter at his studio and interviewed him for this article, which looked at themes of nature and chance in his sculpture and drawings – and discussed his reflections and new directions in his art since he was made a Royal Academician in 2014.

 

IMG_1493

First two pages of the article on Peter Randall-Page

IMG_1494

Second two pages of my article about Randall-Page

My other article is a review of Richard Long’s solo exhibition at Arnolfini, Bristol, last year. I also interviewed Richard for this piece, and so it includes original ideas and quotations from the artist.

IMG_1492

My review of Richard Long’s solo exhibition at Arnolfini, Bristol

 

Presenting 18th-century English drinking glasses

Recently, as research curator at Leamington Spa Art Gallery & Museum, I gave a ‘Friday Focus’ talk about the new display of 18th-century English drinking glasses that I have curated. This talk looked at the collector of the glasses, including an aspect of his life in Leamington, and then considered the different types of glasses that were created throughout the 18th century – and the various techniques used to decorate them. Lastly, I looked at why I chose to display the collection as I did:

Background to the collection and collector

Screen Shot 2016-06-19 at 12.51.54

‘The Collector’ by Henry Holland, 1918, LSAG&M

This display highlights a selection of Leamington Spa Art Gallery & Museum’s collection of 160 English drinking glasses from the 18th century. They were purchased from the collector Francis Jahn in 1955 with the help of the National Art Collections Fund and the V&A Purchase Fund.

Jahn, who was born in 1871 and died in 1967, was a collector of oriental art, ceramics and 18th-century glasses. He followed his German father, Louis Jahn, a curator at the Hanley Museum, who built up a vast private collection of 18th-century Staffordshire pottery during his lifetime, which he left to his son. Many of the finest items were later bequeathed by Francis Jahn himself to Leamington Spa Art Gallery & Museum.  Continue reading

Writing for The British Art Journal

I’m very pleased to have a first article published in The British Art Journal – in the form of a book review of ‘The Diaries of Randolph Schwabe’, edited by Gill Clarke and published by Bristol publishers Sansom & Co.

 

 

 

 

 

How to make the most out of a visit to an art gallery

FullSizeRender

‘Impressionist Exhibition’ etching by my grandmother, Jennifer Beales (nee Caplan)

I’ve written an article about how to make the most out of a visit to an art gallery for Art UK’s new website. It includes eleven tips and also offers a fun challenge to readers, helping people to feel more comfortable with being in an art gallery environment and looking at art.

 

It is primarily aimed at people who may find the experience overwhelming, but can hopefully also give more regular gallery goers some fresh ideas for engaging with art.

A link to the article on Art UK is here.

If you fancy getting involved and sharing your recent experiences of being in an art gallery or your thoughts on particular artworks you see there, please let me and Art UK know by tweeting with the hashtag #visit_art